Everything is a Miracle

by Eileen Campbell

There are so many things to marvel at in our world if our hearts can be open to them, and if we can see them without judging and distorting through our thoughts and opinions.  It was Albert Einstein, father of the Theory of Relativity, who said, ‘There are only two ways to live your life.  One is as though nothing is a miracle.  The other is as though everything is a miracle.’

Starting with ourselves, we can appreciate the miracle of our body and its functioning, which we tend to take for granted until something goes wrong.  The heart, the brain, the organs for digestion and elimination, the senses, all the myriads of cells, nerves, muscles, and tissues, cooperate through an amazing system of interconnections to carry out the necessary functions they perform.  And we are able to walk, dance, sing, play tennis, make love, and do 1,001 things as a result.  Awesome, really!

This amazing orchestration is also mirrored in the world around us.  Beyond ourselves, we are part of larger wholes – family, community, the whole of humanity and life on the planet.  Our existence within the miraculous living organism of Gaia is certainly something to appreciate.  We are all moved by the beauty and magnificence of the natural world with its mountains, plains, forests, rivers, and seas, teeming with life and energy.

Everything is a Miracle

Using our senses, we can wonder at the miracle of life evident all around us on a daily basis.  I’m blessed with a garden, but just as rewarding, if we don’t have one, is a walk in the park or the countryside, or along the beach, or in woodland.  Even walking down a street in the heart of the city or town there is much to marvel at.  We can look at the sky, at the architecture of the buildings surrounding us, maybe there are a few cherry trees with their magnificent frothy blossoms, or some colourful flower displays hanging in doorways or on windowsills.  We can look at people, endlessly fascinating as they go about their lives, each with their own story written on their faces.

If we’re confined indoors because of ill-health or old age, a plant can remind us of our connection to the miracle of life.  Growing bulbs or seeds on a windowsill always thrills me!  And we can be thankful for the treasured possessions and photographs we have around us that evoke memories and give us pleasure.  We can listen to uplifting music.  We can share the space with family and friends when they visit us.  We can be thankful that we are alive and have the opportunity for yet more life experience.

Wherever we are, there are things to delight us.  We only have to be aware and use our senses and open our hearts.  When we are able to appreciate and give thanks for life as it is, and when we revel in the here and now, our hearts are filled with joy.


Eileen Campbell is a writer of inspirational books, including a successful series of anthologies described by the media as “treasures of timeless wisdom,” which sold collectively around 250,000 copies. She has studied with a variety of teachers from different traditions and brings a wealth of knowledge and life experience to her books. She is known for her pioneering and visionary career as a self-help and spirituality publishers, and has also written and presented for BBC Radio 2 and 4. She currently devotes her energies to yoga, writing, and gardening. She lives in England. Visit her at http://www.eileencampbellbooks.com.

9781573246705

Walk Among the Flowers Instead of Walking in Your Own Shadow

by Eileen Campbell

Letting go of negative emotions is vital if we want to have more joy in our lives.  We all experience a broad range of emotions, but negative emotions like fear, anger, resentment, guilt, and shame emerge when life doesn’t go the way we want it, which it rarely does.  Such emotions can be problematic and prevent us from experiencing true joy.  Whereas positive emotions like love, openness, courage, and empathy enhance life and health, negative emotions create tension and stress.

The origin of negative emotions lies in our past.  We have forgotten what was effectively programmed into our brains in childhood and have remained as misperceptions in our thinking. We actually make our lives more difficult than they need be by holding on to long-held beliefs and self-imposed limitations that are no longer appropriate.  As children we wanted love and approval from our parents, and as we grew up, from our teachers and peers.  We learned how to get our needs met by adopting certain patterns of behaviour, and these became habits.  Gradually we created a self-image, and in order to make sense of our lives, we told ourselves stories about who we were, and we continue to do this, modifying and justifying that self-image that is our identity.

Walk Among the Flowers

By becoming more aware of these stories we tell ourselves and the roles we play automatically that cause us unhappiness, we can begin to let go of them.  It’s our thoughts that create emotions, and we tend to think we are our emotions, when they are simply feelings – they are not who we are.  Only when we become more aware of our thoughts can we begin to see them for what they are and let them go.

Although there’s much that we cannot control in life, we always have a choice about what our thoughts dwell on, as Rumi cautioned us:

‘Stop walking in your own shadow

Wallowing in your foolish thoughts.

Raise your head, look at the sun, walk

Among the flowers, become a human being.’

We need to take an honest look at our past in order to understand, leaving behind the hurts, fears, and disappointments of our earlier years.  Whatever happened is in the past, and we need to accept that the wounds were inflicted, but there is no need to keep revisiting them and suffering.  We can let the circumstances of our life close us down, or we can let them open us up.  We can let go of our negative thoughts.  By becoming more aware of the patterns that run through our lives, we can change what we believe is who we are.  Once we see ourselves more clearly we can begin to accept and love ourselves.  We can also reshape our stories to give us what we most want out of life for the future.


Eileen Campbell is a writer of inspirational books, including a successful series of anthologies described by the media as “treasures of timeless wisdom,” which sold collectively around 250,000 copies. She has studied with a variety of teachers from different traditions and brings a wealth of knowledge and life experience to her books. She is known for her pioneering and visionary career as a self-help and spirituality publishers, and has also written and presented for BBC Radio 2 and 4. She currently devotes her energies to yoga, writing, and gardening. She lives in England. Visit her at http://www.eileencampbellbooks.com.

9781573246705

Daring to Be Ourselves!

by Eileen Campbell

It takes courage to be fully human, to wake up to life’s possibilities, and to grow and mature.  We need to be open, yet being open is a risk.  We tend to stay with the known, the familiar, rather than risk the unknown.  Taking risks is scary – we might fail, or experience loss or disappointment, and nothing might turn out as we hope.  Life rarely does go according to plan, but that shouldn’t stop us from moving beyond our comfort zone.  If we don’t take risks life is not being fully lived, and we may experience fear, loneliness and lack of fulfilment.  ‘The day came,’ wrote the author Anais Nin, ‘when the risk to remain tight in the bud was more painful than the risk it took to blossom.’

Taking risks means being open to life’s experiences, being curious about what might be if we were to do something different, break away, or speak out and challenge.  Daring to be ourselves and letting people see who we really are requires courage.  Often we play a role, while underneath we’re a bundle of fears, largely because we were never given a sense of unconditional approval.  We see ourselves as separate from everything and everyone, which leaves us with a sense of being incomplete.  Sometimes we reach a crossroads – we sense a need to live differently.  The authentic self is calling us and we need to listen to the whispers coming from our hearts.  We need to find out who we truly are, and what we really want and need for our growth.

Daring To Be Ourselves

‘Know Thyself’ was inscribed above the entrance to the shrine of Apollo at Delphi, a maxim that was also used in the writings of Plato, Socrates, and Aeschylus, as well as by later philosophers like Hobbes and Rousseau, and poets like Emerson and Coleridge.  When we find the courage to explore the depths of ourselves and make the journey inwards, we develop greater awareness and begin to understand our emotions and thoughts, and have insights as to why they are the way they are.   We need to make time for quiet and reflection and ask for help and guidance.  Meditation, mindfulness, psychotherapy, or counselling can all help us get to know ourselves better.

Gradually we can make changes and adjustments so that our lives seem to run more harmoniously and become richer and more meaningful.  We feel a sense of being connected to something greater than ourselves, yet there’s a softness at the centre that allows us to be more open-hearted – both towards ourselves and others.  We are at ease with who we are.

The Indian teacher Sri Sathya Sai Baba taught that we’re actually three people and suggested that we try to make them one.  ‘There is the one you think you are, the one others think you are, and the one you really are.’  If we can make them one, joy, peace, and bliss will be the result.


Eileen Campbell is a writer of inspirational books, including a successful series of anthologies described by the media as “treasures of timeless wisdom,” which sold collectively around 250,000 copies. She has studied with a variety of teachers from different traditions and brings a wealth of knowledge and life experience to her books. She is known for her pioneering and visionary career as a self-help and spirituality publishers, and has also written and presented for BBC Radio 2 and 4. She currently devotes her energies to yoga, writing, and gardening. She lives in England. Visit her at http://www.eileencampbellbooks.com.

9781573246705

We Don’t Need to Be Perfect!

by Eileen Campbell

Many of us as women try too hard to meet impossible standards of perfection.  We always want to know the answers, do everything right, and never make mistakes.  We try to look well-turned-out, stylish, and attractive, to be professional and efficient in our careers, to be good mothers, considerate partners, dutiful daughters, pillars of the community, etc.  We’re so busy trying to be perfect and hold everything together, we become rigid and inflexible, losing touch with what we’re thinking and feeling, and less able genuinely to connect with others.

The problem is we’ve been conditioned to be perfect and are afraid of getting it wrong.  We’re less likely than men to take risks, believing that we’re not good enough.  Over thousands of years women have been conditioned to feel that their role is secondary to men’s,  and so it’s hard to break out of the mould.  Fear drives us – those subliminal whispers make us doubt our capabilities and tell us we’ll be found out as not up to the task in hand unless we do something perfectly.  The competitive society in which we live can sometimes make us feel envious of others’ seeming good fortune – their looks, their wealth, their success etc. – and we compare ourselves needlessly.

We Don't Need to Be Perfect

For young women, with the pressures from social media, it can be particularly difficult – not only should they be having the most thrilling and perfect time of their lives, but they also have to have a successful career, be getting married, buying a house, and having children.  Sometimes lives can spiral into chaos, when feelings of inadequacy and failing to make the grade become overwhelming, resulting in stress, anxiety, and depression.

We’ve got to learn to be comfortable with imperfection.  We’re human, with all our faults and flaws.  We’re not perfect and our life is a work in progress.  Instead of beating ourselves up for failing to meet the high standards we demand of ourselves, we need to congratulate ourselves on what we’ve achieved.  We need to be kinder to ourselves.  Self-acceptance is one of the most important factors in producing a consistent sense of well-being.

Instead of being afraid that we’re not good enough, we need to learn to be braver and take more risks.  That becomes easier when we feel at ease with who we are.  We need to take care of ourselves in the fullest sense, by slowing down and turning inwards.  When we appreciate who we are, where we are, and what we have in our lives, we can let go of the need to be perfect.


Eileen Campbell is a writer of inspirational books, including a successful series of anthologies described by the media as “treasures of timeless wisdom,” which sold collectively around 250,000 copies. She has studied with a variety of teachers from different traditions and brings a wealth of knowledge and life experience to her books. She is known for her pioneering and visionary career as a self-help and spirituality publishers, and has also written and presented for BBC Radio 2 and 4. She currently devotes her energies to yoga, writing, and gardening. She lives in England. Visit her at http://www.eileencampbellbooks.com.

9781573246705

Learning the Dance of Life

by Eileen Campbell

Life is like a dance, and for the dance we need to be fluid, fearless, and aware.  Everything in life is in a state of constant change, ebbing and flowing, waxing and waning, but we need to trust in the process of constant regeneration.

In Hinduism Shiva, in the form of Nataraj, is the transforming god.  In his cosmic dance, Shiva balances on one leg within a circle of flames, representing the continuous creation, maintenance, and destruction of the universe.  His right foot is poised over a demon representing ignorance, but Shiva’s head is serene.  As the archetypal dancer, Shiva represents the ever-changing life-force with the myriads of worlds, galaxies, and beings taking shape and passing away.  As the archetypal sage, he represents the Absolute where all distinctions dissolve.  This endless round of existence means beginnings and endings, with life renewing itself constantly.

Learning the Dance of Life

Things may fall apart, but out of chaos something new is always being born.  We cannot hold on to anything in life forever – we have to let go.  Relationships dissolve, we lose parents, friends and colleagues, possessions and homes can be destroyed, youth and beauty fade, fame and success are eclipsed, and our bodies wither and cease functioning.  If we can learn to view life as a dance however and trust the Life-force within us to show us the way, wisdom and serenity can triumph over ignorance.

The martial arts like tai chi, aikido judo, karate, and kendo help in physical, mental, emotional and spiritual wellbeing, where the purpose of training is to enable the practitioner to respond in an appropriate manner when under attack.    Thomas Crum, uses the graceful martial art of aikido, often translated as ‘the way of harmonious spirit’, or ‘the way of unifying life energy’ in his well-known conflict resolution and stress management workshops.   He advises us on not being afraid of the ups and downs of life – ‘Instead of seeing the rug pulled from under us, we can learn to dance on the shifting carpet.’


Eileen Campbell is a writer of inspirational books, including a successful series of anthologies described by the media as “treasures of timeless wisdom,” which sold collectively around 250,000 copies. She has studied with a variety of teachers from different traditions and brings a wealth of knowledge and life experience to her books. She is known for her pioneering and visionary career as a self-help and spirituality publishers, and has also written and presented for BBC Radio 2 and 4. She currently devotes her energies to yoga, writing, and gardening. She lives in England. Visit her at http://www.eileencampbellbooks.com.

9781573246705

Walking in Someone Else’s Moccasins

by Eileen Campbell

We often forget how similar we all are underneath our external appearances.  It doesn’t matter what sex, age, race, upbringing, or religion – deep down we all want the same thing – to be happy and avoid pain and suffering.

When we remember that there is a spark of divinity in every one of us, it’s easier to refrain from criticizing or blaming someone because of their behaviour.    Not that it’s any great surprise that we rush to judge others, since we’re quick to berate ourselves for failing to live up to our idea of what we think we should be.  We give ourselves a hard time when we make mistakes and say and do things we wish we hadn’t done, or don’t say and do things it might have been better to have said and done.  If we can’t be kind to ourselves, we’re unlikely to be kind towards others.

Each of us is on a path, and we can never know what someone else’s path is. If we think about our own lives, we know that through our many experiences we are constantly learning and changing.  Events force us to change and grow.  Poets, philosophers and mystics of many persuasions have portrayed the world as a school where we come as souls to learn.  Others too are learning and changing just as we are.

Walking in Someone Else's Moccasins

The Native American saying, ‘Do not judge someone until you have walked a mile in their moccasins’, reminds us of the need to stop and reflect before we criticize or judge someone.  How can we know the reasons for their behaviour unless we put ourselves in their shoes?  Having empathy for others is not always easy, but what we can do is recognize that the divine spark is there in them, just as it is in us.

This doesn’t mean that we condone the other person’s behaviour, but it does mean that we don’t get caught up in a spiral of negativity. If instead we can cultivate empathy, through awareness and listening to their story, then compassion can be the result.  This applies whether we’re dealing with our most intimate relationships, our work colleagues, our neighbours, or even strangers.

When we try to see something from another’s perspective, then we move closer towards tolerance and acceptance of difference.   We begin to recognize our shared humanity, and the deep connection we all share, as different cultures in the past once did, and as indigenous societies still do today.

All the great humanitarians and teachers of different religious traditions have stressed the importance of compassion.  The so-called Golden Rule of treating others as we would wish ourselves to be treated runs through all religions.  ‘My religion is kindness,’ says the Dalai Lama.  The Talmud, the Jewish Book of wisdom, claims, ‘The highest wisdom is kindness.’  Jesus told us to ‘love one another as I have loved you.’  The Koran asks, ‘Do you love your Creator?  Then love your fellow beings first.’

The perceptive writer Aldous Huxley, having explored mysticism and altered states of consciousness, said on his deathbed, ‘Let us be kinder to one another.’  We may not be able to walk in someone else’s shoes, but when we recognize the divine spark within someone, we will naturally be kinder to them.


Eileen Campbell is a writer of inspirational books, including a successful series of anthologies described by the media as “treasures of timeless wisdom,” which sold collectively around 250,000 copies. She has studied with a variety of teachers from different traditions and brings a wealth of knowledge and life experience to her books. She is known for her pioneering and visionary career as a self-help and spirituality publishers, and has also written and presented for BBC Radio 2 and 4. She currently devotes her energies to yoga, writing, and gardening. She lives in England. Visit her at http://www.eileencampbellbooks.com.

9781573246705

Our March Titles Are Here!

Our March titles are now available! Happy reading!


Bigfoot, Yeti and the Last Neanderthal

by Bryan Sykes

“An intriguing book . . . It is this humanity, this cheerful readiness to travel out into the deepest pine forests of Washington State to interview a twitchy hunter in a Chewbacca T-shirt about something he thought he heard groaning in the woods that makes this book worth reading. If science does ever acknowledge the yeti, it will be thanks to somebody very much like Sykes.” —The Times (London)

9781938875151This is “The Big Book of Yetis.” What the reader gets here is a world-class
geneticist’s search for evidence for the existence of Big Foot, yeti, or the abominable snowman.

Along the way, he visits sites of alleged sightings of these strange creatures, attends meetings of cryptozoologists, recounts the stories of famous monster-hunting expeditions, and runs possible yeti DNA through his highly regarded lab in Oxford. Sykes introduces us to the crackpots, visionaries, and adventurers who have been involved in research into this possible scientific dead-end over the past 100 years. Sykes is a serious scientist who knows how to tell a story, and this is a credible and engaging account.

Almost, but not quite human, the yeti and its counterparts from wild regions of the world, still exert a powerful atavistic influence on us. Is the yeti just a phantasm of our imagination or a survivor from our own savage ancestry? Or is it a real creature? This is the mystery that Bryan Sykes set out to unlock.

(Disinformation Books)


The Woman’s Book of Joy

Eileen Campbell

“This book is full of bite-sized treasures. Grab a cup of tea and let the affirmations sink in and nurture your soul. A comforting and life-affirming read.” —Laura Berman Fortgang, author of The Little Book On Meaning and Living Your Best Life

9781573246705This is a book that encourages and inspires women to care more deeply for themselves and to face life’s challenges with courage and joy. It is a practical resource for accessing inner wisdom, enhancing self-esteem, overcoming sorrow, and deepening relationships.

Each of the 150 meditations in this volume begins with an inspirational quote, followed by a thoughtful meditation, and concluded with an affirmation. These meditations provide the opportunity to contemplate a wide range of topics, including,developing awareness, letting go, believing in your dreams, living in the now, trusting the universe and more.

This daily companion is a kind of spa for the soul. Here is a resource that will enable women to experience a little bit of daily serenity and embrace a life of lightness and hope.

(Conari Press)


The Dalai Lama’s Big Book of Happiness

His Holiness the Dalai Lama, edited by Renuka Singh

9781571747396How a person thinks, behaves, and feels ultimately impacts not only their own lives, but also the society in which they live. If you desire to attain happiness, you must understand that the journey begins with you. It is only then that you can reach out and touch the lives of others and change society.

In this anthology, His Holiness the Dalai Lama, with characteristic wisdom, humor, and kindness, directs readers toward a happy, healthy, and peaceful life. Talking about universal themes such as compassion, peace, non-violence, secularism, and the pursuit of a healthy mind and body, he reminds us that the responsibility to change our thoughts, actions, and lives lies within our power.

This is a book for fans of His Holiness, for spiritual seekers, and for those interested in the spiritual and emotional health of individuals and societies.

(Hampton Roads Publishing)


Blame Your Planet

Stella Hyde

I also know enough about astrology to recognize that there’s a fair amount of expertise behind this tongue-in-cheek roasting. Laughing at our idiosyncrasies isn’t such a bad thing, especially when 11/12 of the book is wittily ‘dis-ing everybody else. There’s a good time to be had by all those who have even a little bit of a sense of humor.” —Anna Jedrziewski, Retailing Insight (formerly New Age Retailer)

9781578635986Stella Hyde presents a hilarious exposé of the not-so-nice parts of astrological destiny with shocking conclusions supported by complete astrological research for all 12 signs. In Blame Your Planet, she exposes the hidden underside of the stars, and how they affect the dark side of everyone.

Blame Your Planet covers personalities, rising sign, ruling planet, Moon, qualities, and elements. It also details lifestyle choices (jobs, vacations, fashion, interior design, partners) all from a gripping, yet rarely discussed perspective. Blame Your Planet explores:

  • Your favorite deadly sin
  • Your annoying little ways
  • Your lunar nuisance that cramps your style
  • Your Opposite Sign that connects you to those born under it
  • Your favorite holiday to ruin for everybody
  • Your dream darkside job—spy, assassin, dictator, drug baron, jewel thief, evil genius

Fully illustrated, Blame Your Planet reveals the secret evil twin hidden in all of us. Welcome to the dark side.

Replaces previous edition, ISBN 9781578633104

(Weiser Books)


Communing with the Ancestors

Raven Grimassi

9781578635931This book demonstrates how to communicate and make contact with ancestral spirits, including practical methods for seeking their guidance.Raven Grimassi explores the realm of the ancestors and the role of reincarnation in the soul’s relationship to ancestral lineage. He explains the interactions between ancestors, the living, and the dead and examines how communication with the ancestors is strengthened through various techniques and ritual practices.

True to Raven’s style, the book includes folklore, legend, and superstition surrounding the topic. Shrines, altars, and offerings are discussed in detail. Ancient practices related to communing with the ancestors are revived, and new rituals are provided, including an exercise to lead readers into the “cavern of the ancestors” through guided imagery. Sacred sites, power places, special portals to the ancients, reincarnation, and the “restless dead who are still bound to the earth realm”—he covers it all.

(Weiser Books)


10 Prayers You Can’t Live Without 

Rick Hamlin

“Rick Hamlin, with openness and honesty, breathes fresh air into the subject of prayer.” —Debbie Macomber, New York Times bestselling novelist

“Rick Hamlin cuts through the fog that too often obscures the topic of prayer.” —Philip Yancey, author ofWhere Is God When It Hurts

9781571747419In this inspirational “how-to” book, Guideposts executive editor Rick Hamlin shares ten real-life ways of praying to God. He draws on the practical insight he has gained from the everyday men and women in the pages of Guideposts magazine and from his own lifelong journey in prayer.

He encourages readers to think of prayer as an ongoing conversation that God that should include everything. He expounds on the power of prayer. He discusses how to find a time and place for prayer every day, the importance of praying in times of crisis, of how to ask for forgiveness, and how to listen to the spiritual nudges God gives us.

This is a book filled with practical advice, insight, and inspirational stories; a book for anyone who wants to develop a rich and vibrant spiritual practice.

(Hampton Roads Publishing)


The Soul Discovery Coloring Book

Janet Conner

“This astonishing little book unleashed my wildly joyous and deeply wise inner child. May she never return to captivity!” –Mirabai Starr, author of God of Love and Caravan of No Despair

“Janet and Christine offer such a delightful, whimsical, and soulful gift to the world. I love finding new pathways for the arts to lead me to Spirit and my own true voice, and this is such a delicious roadmap!” –Christine Valters Paintner, PhD, author of nine books including Illuminating the Way: Embracing the Wisdom of Monks and Mystics

The Soul Discovery Coloring Book takes an adventurous and inspired approach to how to have fun connecting deeply with your soul. It is the ‘there is no box’ inspiration that makes this book truly captivating and delightful.” – Lisa Hagan, literary agent and publisher

9781573246859Structured around 22 key questions to ignite the imagination, such as “When I look out, what do I see?” “When I look in, what do I see?” and “If I could create the perfect gate to my extraordinary life, what would it look like?” The Soul Discovery Coloring Book invites readers to:

  • Noodle: use silence, reflection, staring off into space, allowing images to come
  • Doodle: not drawing to replicate, but allowing
  • Color: allowing the colors to choose you
  • Scribble or soul write: scribbling because when we soul write we write fast and messy to get ahead of our conscious mind

For each of the 22 key questions there are 4 pages: the first poses and explores the question and provides an image to color, the second provides an image to color plus space to scribble and doodle, the third offers a quote or small inspiration design for free drawing, and the fourth offers blank space to allow the reader to complete their exploration through writing or coloring.

Adult coloring books are all the rage and The Soul Discovery Coloring Book comes with the added benefit of helping readers to reach deep within themselves to connect with the divine. The result? The reader not only colors a beautiful picture, but also creates a beautiful life.

(Conari Press)


Mudras

Gertrud Hirschi

9781578631391Mudras – also playfully called the “finger power points” – are yoga positions for your hands and fingers. They can be practiced sitting, lying down, standing, or walking. They can be done at any time and place-while stuck in traffic, at the office, watching TV, or whenever you have to twiddle your thumbs waiting for someone. Hirschi shows you how these techniques can prevent illness, relieve stress, and heal emotional problems.