Getting Creative with Your Spirit Guides

by Debra Landwehr Engle

Have you ever wondered what creativity truly is?

What if we defined it as the art of living rather than the art of painting a portrait or writing a novel?

What if creativity isn’t an attribute that only certain people have, but a birthright of being human?

What if creativity isn’t something you do, but it’s who you are?

And what if your spirit guides are your creative partners every moment of your life?

When I was writing Let Your Spirit Guides Speak, my writing guide told me this:

“Creativity is not just a talent some people have. It is the intentional partnership between our world and yours, brought into human form by your willingness to listen.”

In other words, the more you listen, and the more you focus on spiritual guidance and act on it, the more you’ll be able to express your creativity in everything you do.

So when are you creative?

  • Any time there’s a problem and you manifest a solution, you’re creative.
  • Any time you help a friend see things a different way, you’re creative.
  • Every time you turn one thing into something else, you’re creative. (Case in point: transforming eggs, flour and sugar into a cake. It’s the alchemy of creation.)

Essentially, every time you breathe, you’re creative, since creativity is part of your DNA. So the question isn’t, “Am I creative?” Instead it’s, “How can I build an intentional partnership with my guides?”

There are endless ways to do that, but here’s one simple one to supersize your communication with your guides:

Do a vision board with your guides’ help. You may have created a vision board before, but it’s a more powerful exercise when you do it intentionally with your guides.

Get out a large piece of paper, several magazines, a pair of scissors and a glue stick. Now ask your guides what they’d suggest as a focus for your vision board.

Typically, a vision board is a way of visualizing what you’d like to manifest. But it could also be used to answer a question, help resolve an issue or point you in a clear direction.

So close your eyes, sit quietly for a few moments, take in three deep breaths, and ask your guides: “What is the focus of this vision board?” Pay attention to any sensations, images, words or feelings you receive, and trust their guidance for you.

Once you’re clear about the purpose of the vision board, set all expectations aside and ask your guides to lead you to the pictures and words you need most right now. Then simply start flipping through magazines.

Every time you see an image or a word that speaks to you, cut it out and set it aside. Do this for a set period of time—for instance, 10 minutes. Then spend another 10 minutes gluing the pieces at random to your sheet of paper.

Now it’s time to interpret your vision board. Ask your guides for help with this step, too, so you can understand the deeper meaning of the words and images you chose. It’s important not to judge or dismiss anything you put on your vision board. Instead, listen for the meaning.

For instance, if you’re married and you put a picture of a bride on your vision board, ask why. Maybe you’re going to feel newly married again. Maybe someone in your life is getting married and you don’t know it yet.

Ask other questions, too. For instance…

  • “Why did this particular image speak so strongly to me?”
  • “I have lots of white space on my vision board. What does that mean?” Or, in contrast, “My vision board is packed full. What does that mean?”
  • “What’s the connecting thread of the words and images?”
  • “What’s the one thing you want me to know right now?”

This is the beauty of the intentional partnership with your guides. It will reveal to you information and perspectives that you could not have thought of on your own.

So the next time you question your whether you’re a creative being, remember that partnership. Then let your creativity, and your spirit guides, speak.


Debra Engle is the author of the award-winning Let You Spirit Guides Speak and The Only Little Prayer You Need.

Today Is Dark, but Spring Is Just Around the Corner

by Kendra Levin

It can be tough to be a creative artist during the holidays.

Whether you’re a writer or a painter, a composer or a choreographer, making your art requires time, focus, and a certain amount of mental quiet. None of these are in abundance during holiday time.

And 2016’s has been a particularly frazzling season for those who expected election day to bring relief instead of more stress. How can we possibly find the space to be creative between shopping and filing paperwork, between calling our reps and signing petitions, between going to holiday parties and falling down the social media rabbit hole?

But there’s more to making art than the moment of creation.

Today is the winter solstice—the shortest, darkest day of the year. Without the solstice and the ancient rites celebrating it, we wouldn’t have many of the best-loved traditions of the holiday season, including decorative wreaths and Christmas trees. In many ancient cultures, the winter solstice signified the birth of the year and a rebirth for celebrants.

Celebrating on this coldest, darkest day is a reminder to us all that winter and hibernation are an essential part of the cycle of creation. Without the chance to sleep in the soil, deep below the crust of frost, seeds would never be able to germinate, put forth tendrils, and ultimately turn into flowers, trees, crops. Celebrating the cold, the dark, the long night is a way of honoring the entire cycle of creation.

Artists need their creative winter to let ideas germinate and prepare for fruition as much as they need periods of expression. We need to give our art time to live its secret life under the surface before it comes out into the world.

So as you’re hustling around putting up decorations, buying gifts, preparing food, entertaining guests, or simply getting all your end-of-year paperwork in order, remember that you’re already storing up the seeds of ideas that will bear fruit in the new year. Perhaps they’ll emerge as a novel or a play, as poetry or a symphony, a sculpture or a painting. Or maybe your ideas will serve a cause, guide a movement for change, spark a revolution. Do not doubt that the seeds are already within you; give them the time they need to put forth roots.

Today is dark, but spring is just around the corner.


Kendra Levin is a certified life coach for writers, as well as a children’s book editor, teacher, and writer. Since 2008, she has helped writers and other creative artists all over the world meet their goals and connect more deeply with their work and themselves. She has been on the editorial staff at Penguin since 2005, editing all ages from picture books to young adult, and her books have received starred reviews and national awards. Kendra has taught classes for a range of populations from media professionals to prison inmates and has spoken at writers’ conferences and retreats in over twenty states. Her theatrical works have been produced Off- and Off-Off Broadway and regionally, and her eclectic professional writing credits include celebrity speeches, a bar guide, and Mad Libs. Her home base is New York City. Follow her @kendralevin or visit her at www.kendracoaching.com.

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